Interview with RASHA JARHUM, Yemeni Activist

More from the authors RE-OPENING DOORS: WOMEN IN THE YEMENI PEACE PROCESS Nathalia Quintiliano Ungierowicz e Adriana Erthal Abdenur Rasha Jarhum is a Yemeni researcher and activist based in Lebanon, as well as a New Voices Aspen Fellow at the Aspen Institute. She has worked for more than 15 years with Human Rights and gender issues, in partnership with several organizations. She has also collaborated with the UN Special Envoy to Yemen on the inclusion of Yemeni women in the peace negotiations. Along with other names, such as Amal Bashar and Tawakul Kerman, Rasha is one of the activists...

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Re-opening Doors: Women in the Yemeni Peace Process

More from the autrors INTERVIEW WITH RASHA JARHUM, YEMENI ACTIVIST ADRIANA ABDENUR AND NATHALIA QUINTILIANO TELL US ABOUT YEMENI WOMEN’S STRUGGLE FOR EQUAL RIGHTS AND PARTICIPATION IN THE PUBLIC SPHERE IN A CONTEXT OF DISCRIMINATION, POVERTY, AND ARMED CONFLICTS   Nathalia Quintiliano Ungierowicz e Adriana Erthal Abdenur 1- Women in the Conflict in Yemen In May 2016, a delegation from Yemen travelled to Kuwait hoping to make space for women in the UN-supported peace negotiations. At first, the image of the seven women trying to influence the peace process seemed to run against a common narrative in the West...

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Bet Lahem Live: A Festival for Music, Arts, and Social Justice in Palestine

Check out festival official website Read full story about the festival Bonnie McRae, June 16, 2017 2017 is a Significant Year for Palestinians 100 years since the Balfour Declaration (1917)—the first official document stating a national home for the Jewish people would be made in the Holy Land 70 years since the UN Partition of Palestine (1947)—when the United Nations divided up Palestine to make the state of Israel 69 years since the Nakba—“the catastrophe” (1948)—when Palestinians were forcibly removed from their homeland 50 years since Al-Naksa/Six Days War (1967)—the beginning of the Israeli military occupation of the West...

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Bet Lahem Live: A Festival for Music, Arts, and Social Justice in Palestine

Check out festival official website Bonnie McRae, June 16, 2017   Reviving Star Street: Building a Better Future for the Local Community The festival works to rehabilitate a specific section of the Old City, Star Street. Star Street was once a thriving center of Palestinian trade, commerce, and culture — home to local artisan studios and tradesmen shops. In the past, Star Street welcomed and served many international travelers during their pilgrimage in the Holy Land, upon their visits to Jerusalem and Bethlehem — for, Star Street is historically regarded as the path by which Mary and Joseph walked towards the birthplace of Jesus. However,...

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Qatar’s Shame: The workers Sacrificing their youth to bring us the World Cup

Leila Lak  In 2010, to many people’s surprise, Qatar was awarded the 2022 World Cup. With the award the world’s gaze fell on the country and the plight of the migrant workers on whose backs the Cup is being built. “The life that I’m living is a difficult life,” says Carlton, a worker in the new documentary The Worker’s Cup “this is no life, man. You feel trapped because you never get to enjoy the privileges of life” Directed by Adam Sobel and produced by Rosie Garthwaite and Ramzy Haddad, gives a never seen before portrait inside Qatar’s labour...

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Trump and American Muslims

Por Leila Lak On November 9th, for millions of liberals the unimaginable happened, Donald Trump was elected 45th President of the United States.  After months of tirades against Mexicans, Muslims, women and immigrants the elections left many terrified of what a Trump Presidency will look like. The fear is not simply of President-elect Trump himself but of what effects his hateful diatribe has had on America.  FBI statistics suggested that hate crimes against Muslim Americans had increased by 65% in 2015.  Of course the spike could also be partly due to more cases being reported. Incidents of anti-Semitism, hate...

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Life on Hold

Leila Lak “Every time someone goes outside to play while I work I feel like crying,” says Mohammed, a 10-year old boy from Aleppo, who with his family fled the Syrian war to seek refuge in Lebanon.  Once in Lebanon, their lives changed. They moved into illegal settlements and as his father could not find a job that paid enough to keep the family he sent Mohammad to work. His is one of several stories recounted in the Al Jazeera English’s IDFA award nominated web documentary Life on Hold http://lifeonhold.aljazeera.com.   Revista Diaspora interviewed the director Reem Haddad. As a daughter of...

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Making sense of a life without sense

Leila Lak On the 5th September 2011, Tammam Azzam’s life changed forever.  At the age of 30, the Syrian artist was forced to flee his homeland and start a life in exile. “I was working on a series in Damascus before I left, it was called the laundry series, which required me picking clothes from the streets of Damascus and making collages. But that all ended when I moved to Dubai,” said Azzam over Skype from Dubai. “I don’t care about the people here (in Dubai) like I do my own people.” Azzam was catapulted into international fame when...

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So Far, So Close

Leila Lak Carla Barchini, a Lebanese-Greek artist, moved with her family to Europe during the Lebanese civil war of 1975. Like many in her generation growing up in exile she dreamt of a day that she would return to her homeland. When she finally moved back in 2013 she did so with her first solo show and has since developed further as an artist and her work has also been exhibited in several collective shows.   Barchini is currently an artist in resident at Largo Das Artes/Despina in Rio and she feels her work in this city is being highly...

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Wanton Bishops

Leila Lak The Blues and Beirut are not two words you often see in one sentence, but the first Lebanese Blues band Wanton Bishops are adding blues to the eclectic music scene in Beirut.  Ben Holman a British documentary filmmaker living in Brazil followed their journey from Lebanon to the Deep South of the United States. “Beirut reminds me of Rio ten years ago,” says Holman of his time in the Lebanese capital.  Holman was sent to Beirut by Red Bull to film the journey of harmonica player and lead singer Nader Mansour and guitarist Eddy Ghossein from Beirut...

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